Blog Archives

What’s cooking, 1910’s?

I’m developing my fourth novel, set after World War I, and as always, interested in finding out what people were eating. Here’s some of the new foods on the market and around town. In some cases, the dates are the

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Food

A fatal shibboleth and a fine pasta

Today’s word in Word.A.Day in my inbox, referencing a Sicilian uprising in 1282 led me to a recipe for one of my favorite easy pastas, pasta con ceci [aka chickpeas/garbanzos]. It happened this way. The word was shibboleth, which as

Tagged with:
Posted in WWWS

Okra and the Belgians

After World War II, my mother moved north from a truck farm then outside of Houston, Texas with a taste for kidney and lima beans, okra and Fritos, a Texas cash crop since 1933. My father was from Brooklyn and

Tagged with:
Posted in WWWS

What Americans ate in the 1910’s, etc.

Ohh, I just found a wonderful site  called Food Timeline if you’re wildly or mildly curious about what people ate in the 1910’s (my case) or in decades after. You’ll find menus, cookbooks, recipes, prices, new rages, like the “cocktail party,”

Tagged with:
Posted in WWWS

Where’s that sabrage knife?

We had a chance to buy a very nice sabrage knife this summer, but even Maurizio with his mania for acquiring kitchen things his wife finds optional drew (or cut) the line at a $500 (circa) sabrage knife. The experience

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in WWWS

Lula’s Beer Cheese

Readers of When We Were Strangers may remember Lula, the cook and housekeeper for the Cleveland workhouse where Irma made collars. That was in the 1880’s. After the book came out, a suggestion was made by HarperCollins to write a

Tagged with:
Posted in WWWS

Panna cotta, pure & simple

Some of the seeming classics of Italian post-dinner cuisine — tiramisu’, torta caprese, limoncello, and panna cotta (lit. “cooked cream”) are in fact rather late, post 1980’s entries on the popular culinary scene. Renaissance folks didn’t eat them. Little Sofia

Tagged with:
Posted in WWWS
Announcements

Workshop on Point of View for the Knoxville Writers Guild, Sat. Feb. 18, 2017, 10am to noon

For more events and specifics, please click on Events.

Recent Review
“Absorbing and layered with rich historical details, in Under the Same Blue Sky, Schoenewaldt weaves a tender and at times, heartbreaking story about German-Americans during World War I. With remarkable compassion, the author skillfully portrays conflicted loyalties, the search for belonging, the cruelty of war, and the resilience of the human spirit.”—Ann Weisgarber, author of The Promise and The Personal History of Rachel Dupree

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts.

Join 2,152 other followers