Blog Archives

So many orphans

Pre-20th Century European literature is full of orphans. For good reason. Consider these statistics from the Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood in History and Society. In 17th & 18th C western European, 1 out of 3 children had lost at

Posted in WWWS

Our Irish-Bulgarian Cabbage Connection

For St. Patrick’s Day, we’re having corned beef and Bulgarian cabbage. The recipe for the latter was part of our daughter Emilia’s patrimony when we adopted her at age 10 from Bulgaria. With no English, she took us shopping for

Posted in Food, WWWS

Lessons from Raking

We have two large red oak trees in our front yard. I am the designated raker. Nobody is jockeying to take this post from me so I have plenty of time to muse while raking each fall. As in, “I

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What could get you locked up

The research I did in writing Swimming in the Moon on treatment of mental illness in the early 20th C was scary enough. Here are reasons a person (especially a woman, foreigner or poor person) could get committed in the

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End of the Red Baron

My novel in progress includes mention of the Baron Manfred von Richthofen, aka the Red Baron, the Kaiser’s fearless flying ace, who reached cult status on both sides during World War I for his prowess in shooting down Allied planes.

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The real Rosie the Riveter

I’m thinking lots of people knew this but it’s new to me. The woman featured in the iconic “We Can Do It!” wartime poster is not Rosie the Riveter. More on her later. The “We Can Do It!” poster was

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A fatal shibboleth and a fine pasta

Today’s word in Word.A.Day in my inbox, referencing a Sicilian uprising in 1282 led me to a recipe for one of my favorite easy pastas, pasta con ceci [aka chickpeas/garbanzos]. It happened this way. The word was shibboleth, which as

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Announcements

Sunday, May 6, 2pm reading from latest work at Hexagon Brewing Company, Knoxville, TN.

Thursday, May 10, 6-8 pm presentation on research on the historical novel, Blount Count Library, Maryville, TN.

When We Were Strangers, Italian translation, tp rot be sented in Pescasseroli, Italy, August 2018.

Recent Review
“Absorbing and layered with rich historical details, in Under the Same Blue Sky, Schoenewaldt weaves a tender and at times, heartbreaking story about German-Americans during World War I. With remarkable compassion, the author skillfully portrays conflicted loyalties, the search for belonging, the cruelty of war, and the resilience of the human spirit.”—Ann Weisgarber, author of The Promise and The Personal History of Rachel Dupree

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