Fruili Potatoes

images-1Being recently in possession of some turnips, I was happy to find a recipe for same from Friuli, a beautiful, not enough visited wine-growing region of north-east Italy near Slovenia. Friuli was under the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which accounts for its high sense of order, great pastries, and the Mittel European quality of this recipe. With turnips it was wonderful; with potatoes “la morte sua” (lit. “its death” but in a good way).

Friuli Potatoes
3-4 mid-sized potatoes
4 T butter
2 T poppy seeds
salt & pepper
1 T paprika
1/4 C red wine vinegar
parsley

Peel the potatoes and cut into chunks. Melt butter until it begins to brown. Toss in potatoes, stir to cover, add salt, pepper, poppy seeds and cook until just beginning to brown, stirring frequently. Maybe 8 minutes. Add paprika and stir. Add vinegar, cover tightly and cook until tender but not mushy, stirring gently occasionally. You don’t want the potatoes to lose their shape (remember, the Austro-Hungarian order). When a fork pierces easily, remove from heat, add parsley and serve,

Pamela Schoenewaldt, historical novels of immigration and the search for self in new worlds: WHEN WE WERE STRANGERS, SWIMMING IN THE MOON, and UNDER THE SAME BLUE SKY (all HarperCollins).

Posted in Food

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Announcements

Workshop on Point of View for the Knoxville Writers Guild, Sat. Feb. 18, 2017, 10am to noon

For more events and specifics, please click on Events.

Recent Review
“Absorbing and layered with rich historical details, in Under the Same Blue Sky, Schoenewaldt weaves a tender and at times, heartbreaking story about German-Americans during World War I. With remarkable compassion, the author skillfully portrays conflicted loyalties, the search for belonging, the cruelty of war, and the resilience of the human spirit.”—Ann Weisgarber, author of The Promise and The Personal History of Rachel Dupree

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts.

Join 2,152 other followers

%d bloggers like this: