Fates of bustles and sleeves

In the 1880s, as my protagonist Irma entered the world of women’s fashion, machine-made clothes were readily available and upper class women, with money to burn sought out skilled dressmakers to embellish, over-lay, tuck and gather, creating elaborate architectures, often framed around bustles. So we have the famed First or “hard” Bustle Period of the 1870s giving way to the Second or “soft” Bustle Period of the 1880s, both feeding the hips-and-backview fetish of Victorian men and fashionistas. In the 1890s, bustles were out, gone, booted. Now, fashion architects turned to bizarre sleeve structures, with Punch magazine ready with mockery. For more on the bustle, elegantly written, see the lovely site Such Eternal Delight from whence comes this illustration.

Pamela Schoenewaldt, historical novels of immigration and the search for self in new worlds: WHEN WE WERE STRANGERS, SWIMMING IN THE MOON, and UNDER THE SAME BLUE SKY (all HarperCollins).

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Announcements

Under the Same Blue Sky, publication! May 5, 2015. Launch at Laurel Theater, Knoxville on May 7 @ 7 pm.

Monday, May 11, 7pm, Barnes & Noble, 2501 West End Ave. Nashville.

Thursday, May 14. 6:30-8 pm. Shell Shock & PTSD: Fiction & Fact. Lawson McGhee Public Library, Knoxville, TN

Friday, June 5, 6-8pm. Union Ave. Booksellers, 517 Union Ave, Knoxville.

October 9-11. Southern Festival of Books, Nashville.

Swimming in the Moon will be published in German. November, 2015

Recent Review
“Absorbing and layered with rich historical details, in Under the Same Blue Sky, Schoenewaldt weaves a tender and at times, heartbreaking story about German-Americans during World War I. With remarkable compassion, the author skillfully portrays conflicted loyalties, the search for belonging, the cruelty of war, and the resilience of the human spirit.”—Ann Weisgarber, author of The Promise and The Personal History of Rachel Dupree"

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